The Four Seasons of Vintage

Homesickness

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When I was a child the winter holidays fell into the two rough categories of food and style: traditional Italian dishes prepared by my mother and grandmother, and velvet dresses worn with patent leather shoes. Over the years I have held on to the traditional dishes while letting go of velvet dresses in favor of tweed pants, and the patent leather shoes have been replaced by waterproof nylon and leather. In recent weeks, my holiday style vocabulary has expanded to include fleece and Hot Chillys long johns.

I’ve traded cold and snowy New England for sunny and warm Southern California, New Year’s Eves in dimly lit restaurants and bars for the warmth and light of the desert. And this year, for my first New Year’s Eve on the beach, all my favorite things can somehow wondrously coexist – Italian food, the ocean, tweed, and base layers.

I’m encouraged as I write this by Robyn Davidson‘s words at the end of her story Tracks about her journey across 1,700 miles of Australian desert to the sea with merely four camels and her dog for company: “Sometimes I find these changes so upsetting…..other times I think that the homesickness is for an experience that could in any case never be repeated, and for people and ways of thought whose rightful place is in the past….Camel trips do not begin or end, they merely change form.”

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Essays and Musings

Outward Bound

Marmot rain jacket

Marmot rain jacket

Heavy rains have descended on the Pacific Northwest recently, causing flooding and power outages, along with some tragic deaths. All I know of these storms is what I read on the various internet weather sites. I live in Southern California, a region that is only rarely visited by such storms. I heard about flooding in Portland, Oregon just this morning, too late to think about turning back: my husband and I fly out from Los Angeles early on Sunday. It will be my first trip to the Pacific Northwest, and the weather forecast is predicting rain with snow for our weeklong stay in Oregon.

My fanciful vision of Portland, full of bearded men who knit and tattooed women who embrace a natural beauty, has become overshadowed by the threat of severe weather for which I’m not accustomed to dressing. Because I will need to be prepared for both city and country (we’re planning on doing some glamping and a fair amount of hiking and waterfall seeing) about a month ago, when I began to make a mental list of clothes to bring, I discovered that I had none. The fact that up until two weeks ago I owned neither fleece nor any waterproof clothing, did not greatly surprise or panic me, as I have lived in a deluded ignorance of wet weather for the past thirteen years. Despite a closet full of coats in various styles, on most days, regardless of the season, I have no need of any outerwear at all.

My recently acquired Pacific Northwest wardrobe includes but is not limited to the following: a Columbia full zipper fleece, a pair of Ex Officio stain and water resistant pants, a Marmot waterproof seam taped jacket with an attached adjustable hood that rolls into the collar, and a pair of Nike Kynsi waterproof boots. I am most excited by the Marmot jacket that boasts a chin guard. As it turns out, the fulcrum upon which my new Pacific Northwest wardrobe rests is the base layer – athletic shirts made out of breathable fabric that wick moisture away. Though I had never before heard the term base layer and needed the sales assistant to explain its meaning, a sense of pride washed over me when I realized that I already owned three of them.

Dressing for place and climate have always been as important to me as dressing for the occasion. It’s only in this way that you are able to forget yourself a bit in order to immerse yourself in the new. I’m optimistic my wardrobe will put me at ease with the weather and make me thankful for the quiet days spent outward bound.

Columbia fleece, Ex Officio pants, Nike boots

Columbia fleece, Ex Officio pants, Nike boots

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